Gastro pH

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Celarity Gastro pH Formula

BALANCE YOUR STOMACH'S PH AND SUPPORT HEALTHY DIGESTION


Digestion and gut related complaints are some of the most predominant problems among adults, even "healthy" individuals. One major reason is due to low stomach acid (low hydrochloric acid). Low levels of hydrochloric acid have a significant impact on the body's natural ability to digest and absorb nutrients. Adequate hydrochloric acid is fundamental to healthy protein digestion, nutrient availability, and the maintenance of normal gastric flora.[1-3] Maintaining an acidic pH in the stomach helps support normal gastric and intestinal flora as well.[6-8] Gastro pH is designed to support the gastric phase of digestion by providing hydrochloric acid and supporting natural gastric secretions to support normal digestion, absorption and immune health. [5]

 




What Is Gastro pH?

Gastro pH was designed with a variety of health-supportive factors to assist in balancing your stomach pH levels, optimize protein digestion, and increase nutrient absorption. Gastro pH features L-glutamic acid, betaine HCI, and pepsin which assist in protein digestion. Gentian root promotes normal secretion of saliva and gastric acid to aid in provide digestion support. Hydrochloric acid supports nutrient absorption while maintaining a healthy gastric pH. Together, the ingredients in Gastro pH support a healthy gastric ecology.


SYMPTOMS OF LOW STOMACH ACID

  • Anemia (iron deficiency)
  • Bloating
  • Burping
  • Deficiencies in other nutrients, such as b12, magnesium, and protein
  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Gas
  • GI Infections
  • Hair loss
  • Heartburn/Indigestion
  • Nausea when taking vitamins
  • Neurological issues such as numbness/tingling
  • Upset stomach
  • Weak fingernails



WHAT CAUSES LOW STOMACH ACID?


Low levels of hydrochloric acid can have a profound effect on the body's ability to digest food and absorb nutrients. There is a natural decline in the body's ability to produce hydrochloric acid, especially after the age of 60.[1] With normal aging, there appears to be an even greater decline in pepsin product.[4] Besides aging, these can also cause low stomach acid:

  • High levels of stress
  • Vitamin deficiency
  • Prolonged use of a medication that reduces stomach acid
  • H. pylori infection
  • Stomach surgery
Stomach secretions usually have a very low pH (1-2), meaning they are highly acidic. Your stomach pH may indicate the following:
Stomach pH Diagnosis
Less than 3 Normal
Between 3 and 5 Hypochlorohydria
Greater than 5 Achlorhydria
APPLICATIONS
  • Balances your Gastric pH levels by Providing Hydrochloric Acid
  • Contains Factors to Promote Healthy Digestion, Especially of Dietary Protein
  • Supports Absorption of Certain Macro- and Micronutrients
  • Helps Maintain Normal Gastric Flora

INGREDIENTS THAT WORK

Gastro pH is formulated with a variety of compounds and is designed to support gastric acidity, digestion, and normal gastrointestinal flora.

L-GLUTAMIC ACID
This amino acid can be obtained from dietary protein or synthesized endogenously from other amino acids, such as glutamine. L- glutamic acid is used in Gastro pH as an acidifying agent.

BETAINE HYDROCHLORIDE (HCL)
Betaine (also known as trimethylglycine) is a natural substance found in foods such as beets, spinach, and grains. Research suggests that betaine supports cell health by acting as a methyl donor, and this, in turn, supports healthy methionine, homocysteine, and hepatic fat metabolism. Betaine also functions as an osmolyte, which supports the integrity of cells and proteins during fluctuations in hydration, salinity, and temperature. Betaine HCl, the acidic form of betaine, has traditionally been used to support digestion and absorption due to its ability to lower gastric pH.[9,10]

PEPSIN
One of the first enzymes to initiate protein digestion, pepsin is first synthesized in the parietal cells of the gastric mucosa and secreted as the inactive zymogen precursor pepsinogen. Hydrochloric acid activates pepsinogen to convert it to pepsin once it is outside the cell. This activation sets up a chain reaction leading to the production of still more pepsin. Porcine pepsin, in addition to betaine HCl, is provided in Gastro pH with the goal of promoting more endogenous pepsin production.[4,6]

GENTIAN ROOT (GENTIANA LUTEA)
Used for centuries to support healthy digestion, gentian contains the bitter glycosides gentiopicrin and amarogentin. Gentian’s bitter taste can be detected even at a dilution level of 50,000:1. Gentian root appears to support digestion by stimulating secretion of saliva in the mouth, hydrochloric acid in the stomach, and digestive juices from the pancreas. Due to the stimulant effect that gentian root has on endogenous production of HCl, individuals may be able to discontinue Gastro pH after a period of use.[11-14]

Celarity Company Statement
Celarity Gastro pH is a state of the art product that is pharmaceutical grade and only to be sold by licensed practitioners. Celarity prides itself on being on the forefront of innovation in the natural health and holistic healing field. Celarity also prides itself on working with innovative doctors who are disruptors in the health care field.

Count:90 vegetarian capsules

Suggested use:Take one capsule with meals, or as directed by your healthcare practitioner. Gastro pH should be taken with, or immediately following a meal. Do not use if there is a prior history of, or a current complaint of, a peptic or duodenal ulcer. Consult your healthcare practitioner prior to use. Individuals taking medication should discuss potential interactions with their healthcare practitioner. Do not use if tamper seal is damaged.

Does not contain:Wheat, gluten, yeast, soy protein, animal or dairy products, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, egg, ingredients derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs), artificial colors, artificial sweeteners, or artificial preservatives.

References:
1. Bland J, Liska D, Jones DS, et al. Clinical Nutrition A Functional Approach. 2nd ed. Gig Harbor, WA: The Institute for Functional Medicine. 2004.
2. Giannella RA, Broitman SA, Zamcheck N. Gastric acid barrier to ingested microorganisms in man: studies in vivo and in vitro. Gut. 1972 Apr;13(4):251-6. [PMID: 4556018]
3. Lovat LB. Age related changes in gut physiology and nutritional status. Gut. 1996 Mar;38(3):306-9. [PMID: 8675079]
4. Feldman M, Cryer B, McArthur KE, et al. Effects of aging and gastritis on gastric acid and pepsin secretion in humans: a prospective study. Gastroenterology. 1996 Apr;110(4):1043-52. [PMID: 8612992]
5. Untersmayr E, Jensen-Jarolim E. The effect of gastric digestion on food allergy. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Jun;6(3):214-9. Review. [PMID: 16670517]
6. Smolin LA, Grosvenor MB. Nutrition: Science and Applications. 2nd ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2010.
7. Canani RB, Terrin G. Gastric acidity inhibitors and the risk of intestinal infections. Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;26(1):31-5. Review. [PMID: 19907324]
8. Kanno T, Matsuki T, Oka M, et al. Gastric acid reduction leads to an alteration in lower intestinal microflora. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2009 Apr 17;381(4):666-70. [PMID: 19248769]
9. Craig SA. Betaine in human nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Sep;80(3):539-49. Review. [PMID: 15321791]
10. New York University Langone Medical Center. Betaine Hydrochloride. http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=21560. Last Reviewed 2011. Accessed March 23, 2012.
11. Mowrey D. Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine. New Canaan, CT: McGraw-Hill. 1999.
12. Monterey Bay Spice Company. Gentian Root. http://www.herbco.com/p-763-gentian-root-cs-wild-... Accessed March 25, 2012.
13. Vilkin A, Levi Z, Morgenstern S, et al. Higher gastric mucin secretion and lower gastric acid output in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2008 Jan;42(1):36-41. [PMID: 18097287]
14. Behrens M, Brockhoff A, Batram C, et al. The human bitter taste receptor hTAS2R50 is activated by the two natural bitter terpenoids andrographolide and amarogentin. J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Nov 11;57(21):9860-6. [PMID: 19817411]
15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038...
16. https://www.clinicaleducation.org/resources/revie...
17. https://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(...

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.